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Taureg by Alberto Vázquez-Figueroa

taureg

One of Gazel’s guests is murdered, and so he must fight to fix the wrongs according to his ancestor’s ways. His journey takes him from the middle of the Sahara Desert to a wasteland from which no one returns to a foreign city beside the sea. In this story, tradition clashes with the modern life as good intentions clash with corruption. Upholding either law only seems to add to the chaos of Gazel’s solitary war.

Gazel is a hero with a flaw, which of course makes this story a tragedy. He has a lot of persistence and resourceful skills. His presence makes the book fun to read. The other characters definitely add to the color of the story. There are Gazel’s foil, the ultimate bad guy, the nice guy just following orders, the nurturing women, and then pawns of the military. Ultimately, independence and remaining faithful to your values permeates this story.

I don’t necessarily agree with the treatment of some of the characters, but that’s probably because I’m not used to the Tuaregs’ culture. The story was translated from Spanish, but it’s still well written. It flows very well, but unfortunately, it doesn’t have any chapter markers. Every now and then, there are breaks in between the storyline and perspective changes. Some of the perspective changes are confusing because the section starts with “he” rather than a name. Grammar mistakes can be found in the book; there are a few missing verbs and common problems.

I found this book on Goodreads and downloaded a PDF version for free.

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New Release – Their Promise

Today I bring you a book on sale: Their Promise by Brina Courtney.

Theirpromise

Overview:
One moment can change your life.
One moment to find love.
One moment to lose it.


Hannah Dewmont and Chase Harper are the perfect pair. With their lives intertwined since childhood and their love in full bloom, it seems only natural that they’d make plans for a future together. A future that includes promises… promises that will prove impossible to keep.


If you’re looking for a new YA book (which is geared more towards New Adults 18-20-somethings), you can check this one out. You can find it on Amazon or Barns & Nobles. It seems like it can get quite emotional when he pulls out a ring and asks Hannah to love him forever The book is $0.99 for a limited time, and it may just be a good late Valentine read for you.


Brina - Author PhotoBrina Courtney is a young adult author obsessed with chocolate, crime shows, and fantasy movies. She’s spent the last few years as a beauty queen and elementary teacher. She lives in a small town in Pennsylvania with her husband and two very loud, small dogs.

Contact her! Twitter | Website | Facebook | Goodreads

Candy and the Cankersaur by Jason Sandberg

Candy and the  CankersaurOverview: Candy’s father brings her lots of cool toys from all over the world, but he rarely spends time with her. To make his daughter feel less lonely, he buys her a Cankersaurus Rex, which she names Cank. Candy spends lots of time playing and training with Cank, but her next door neighbor becomes jealous and steals Cank. Will Cank and Candy ever be together again?

I was asked to review Candy and the Cankersaur by the author, Jason Sandberg, and I have to say it’s a great child’s ebook. For one, the colors are amazing, for the lack of better words. They’re very complimentary, and I love the repeating purple and yellow scheme. The scenes just pop out and they’re very vibrant, which will definitely hold the attention of a child. Even though it’s drawn in a cartoon style, the objects also have textures, and so it doesn’t look like a flat picture. There’s definitely substance on every page.

The writing is a bit different from other children’s books, and I mean that in a good way. Instead of just simple sentences, the author uses complex constructions, which are great for introducing a child to a wide variety of language skills. He also uses not so common children’s words, like sulk and devoured, but that’s a great way for a child to expand his or her vocabulary. I think this would be a great book for parents and children to read together.

The story itself is rather complex. It’s not just one straight line, but rather a story that has a plot and character development. It’s interesting how there are parent-child relationships, friend relationships, and pet-ownership relationships that all develop within about 28 pages. If you’re looking for an ebook for your child, I highly suggest this one. Besides, it has a dinosaur. What’s better than that?

On a side note: Perhaps this is me being too picky, but it’s a bit depressing that the dinosaur, Cank, only has one facial expression. When it says that he’s frightened, the dinosaur still looks happy. However, the people characters display emotions well.

For more information, check out the ebook’s webpage: Candy and the Cankersaur.

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Delivered to My Kindle 1/15/13

Here’s a books that’s free on Kindle right now. It’s in the historical fiction genre.

13601874To Kill the Duke by Sam Moffie.

Description: It was the 1950’s. The white-hot Cold War was raging between The USA and The USSR. And, in Joseph Stalin’s mind, nothing would be quite as hot as assassinating the ultimate symbol of Western machismo culture – the actor John Wayne. Thus, the elite Russian spy squad of Zavert, Boris Gila, Alexei Aleksandra and Ivan Viznapu start on a dangerous (and hysterical) mission that brings them in contact with gangsters Mickey Cohen and Johnny Stompanato, the billionaire Howard Hughes, the producer/director Dick Powell, the actress Susan Hayward, countless others and the big man himself – John Wayne.

What transpires is as zany as John Wayne playing a role that was written for Marlon Brando… whoops! That really happened, and the result was ‘The Conqueror,” which plays a prominent role in to kill the duke, Sam Moffie’s fifth novel. Brilliantly satiric, the book also captures political duplicity and amorality, which makes it all too relevant to today’s world. The Cold War, more than ready for prime time satire, lets Moffie keep the heat on the establishment and most of all, those in authority.

Delivered to My Kindle 11/6/12

I’m back again after a break from last week. It’s becoming hard to find interesting free ebooks. As always, DISCLAIMER: I don’t know how good these books actually are, all I know is that they sound interesting and they’re free

 

Call of the Herald by Brian Rathbone.

Description: Book One of The Dawning of Power trilogy. Echoes of the ancients’ power are distant memories, tattered and faded by the passage of eons, but that is about to change. A new dawn has arrived. Latent abilities, harbored in mankind’s deepest fibers, wait to be unleashed. Ancient evils awaken, and old fears ignite the fires of war.
The second book in the series, Inherited Danger, is also available today.

 

 

I know it isn’t much, but most of the free ebooks I found were books I already shared on previous DTMKs. Maybe I’ll have better luck next time.

 

 

The Amulet by Alison Pensy

Overview from Goodreads: To seventeen-year-old Faedra, faeries were nothing more than the figurines she collected and displayed in her curio cabinet. She was in for the surprise of her life.

Faedra had no idea that faeries controlled nature, and with a book no less. Nor did she know that her descendants had protected an ancient fae amulet for thousands of years. An amulet that if ever was reunited with the book would give the wearer power to control the weather, too. She didn’t know all this because the one person to teach her died when she was just six years old. Well, now it was time for her to find out…

A letter from the grave reveals her true identity the day of her eighteenth birthday. But she barely has time to digest the revelation when she is plunged into a fight for her life and that of mankind.

My thoughts: Honestly, I’d give this book more of a 3.5. I really enjoyed reading it, but there were a few things that confused me.

Let’s begin with the impossible actions. There are a few scenes that seems impossible to me. The action described defies the basic laws of physics. I recognize that they’re in another world with magic, so it’s possible for unrealistic things to happen. However, the skeptic in my just doesn’t agree with the possibility of defying the laws of nature in a book that’s not science fiction.

I do like the main character Faedra. Her “goody-two-shoes” personality appeals to me because sweet main characters aren’t too common lately. The author does a good job of creating a character that is nice and usually follows the rules but still has quirks that makes her interesting. The one thing I don’t like about Faedra is that sometimes she seems like Kristen Stewart, except with four emotions instead of one. She’s also easily impressed and usually dropping her jaw.

There are some instances in which Faen acts out of character. It could be because Faen is guarding himself well and only let’s his real personality out occasionally, but sometimes I just don’t understand why Faen acts out of character, especially later in the book when developing his relationship with Faedra. I like their relationship and friendship, and I think it adds a great element to the book. However, their relationship seems awkward at first, and my reaction to their relationship climax was, “What the heck did I just read?!” I think the climax could’ve been orchestrated better and not seem so force.

Plot wise, I love the twists and turns. It’s not just like any other faerie/fairy story out there.  I love love how Faedra’s mother plays into this story. The mysterious mother keeps my attention, and I hope there’s more information about her in later books. I like how she purposely laid out Faedra’s task yet still left questions for Faedra to solve, allowing Faedra to grow on her own.

One other thing that bugs me is Faedra’s interactions with her family. Maybe the British act differently than Americans, but Faedra’s relationship with her father, uncle, and aunt just seem so casual. She doesn’t address Uncle Leo’s wife as “Aunt Nicki.” It’s just Nicki. To me, this is completely disrespectful. She also treats the older people in her family more like friends than family, and it just baffles me. However, I realize that all families are different, and that I should appreciate this book showing me a different style of family. It’s just very different from my own.

There’s lots of description, and some of it is chunky. It makes the book a bit hard to slug through at times. That’s the main easy I didn’t rate this book as a 4. Description can be a good thing, and sometimes it’s well used in this book. However, if some of it was subtracted or made more concise, the book wouldn’t have lost its meaning.

Also, just for kicks, since the author grew up in England, she uses lots of British terms. I learned some new words from this book. Yay, learning experiences!

I found this book for free on Amazon and downloaded it to my Kindle.

Delievered to My Kindle 10/23/12

Welcome to another DTMK Edition! Just a reminder — DISCLAIMER: I don’t know how good these books actually are, all I know is that they sound interesting and they’re free.

 

The Soulkeepers by G.P. Ching: I’m really looking forward to this book. Most of the stories I read usually involve someone trying to revive another person back from the dead and have to battle a gatekeeper. This time it’s about a gatekeeper. ^_^

Description: When fifteen-year-old Jacob Lau is pulled from the crumpled remains of his mother’s car, no one can explain why he was driving or why the police can’t find his mother’s body. A beautiful and mysterious neighbor offers to use her unique abilities to help him find his mom. But in exchange she requires Jacob to train as a Soulkeeper, a protector of human souls. He agrees to her demands, desperate for any clue to the mystery of his mother’s disappearance. But soon Jacob finds himself trapped in a web of half-truths, and questions her motives for helping him.

 

11:15: The Making of a Halfling by Heather Burch: Some of the stories I’ve read about halflings or someone changing into a mythical creature haven’t been so great. There are few that really call out to me. However, the book is free, so might as well get it just in case it’s somewhat decent. The description isn’t very…descriptive, but it has some good reviews on Amazon.
Description: Mace and Raven are given a mission to stop a catastrophic event. With his halfling abilities still untapped, Vine is allowed to join the mission, but only as a spectator. The clock is ticking and the tragedy is proving difficult to stop. Will Vine be able to sit back and watch, or will the power of heaven unleash just in time?

 

 

Stuck in the Middle by Virginia Smith: At first, I was really weary about this book, mainly because it involves spirituality and romance. So to be honest, I picked up this ebook for a good laugh and to make fun of it. We’ll see how I feel about it when I start reading it. Maybe it’s better than I expect

Description: Joan Sanderson’s life is stuck. Her older sister, Allie, is starting a family and her younger sister, Tori, has a budding career. Meanwhile, Joan is living at home with Mom and looking after her aging grandmother. Not exactly a recipe for excitement. That is, until a hunky young doctor moves in next door. Suddenly Joan has a goal–to get a date. But it won’t be easy. Pretty Tori flirts relentlessly with him and Joan is sure that she can’t compete. But with a little help from God, Allie, and an enormous mutt with bad manners, maybe Joan can find her way out of this rut.